Learning Olympic Lifts – the Dead Lift

Olymic lift clip artOlympic lifts are great for core stability and work a large number of muscles at the same time.  They are very common exercises with most athletes and currently ‘trendy’ in the mainstream fitness industry due to Crossfit.  Anyone can learn how to do Olympic Lifts and correct technique is extremely important which can make learning a little frustrating but at the same time extremely rewarding.  This clip shows an athlete slowly progressing in technique.  He still has a long way to go before he gets it right but practice makes perfect.

iPhone Video Clip (apologies for the quality) – This is Lewis, training to make the U22 National Team and he knows that Olympic lifts will give him the strength he needs.

Watch him as he learns to hold form and improves throughout the clip. He is ‘clear’ on his focus points, he ‘knows’ what to do, but needs practice under supervision which is what he is doing here.

Just prior to this he was bending/trying to pull with his arms and once this was fixed we started to correct his hip movement.  His hips are the first thing to move, which is incorrect!  Watch as he tries to stabilise and lower his hips into the best start position, by the last repetition you can see he is progressing. At absolute minimum his hips and shoulders must move simultaneously, but clearly his hips are leading.

I find showing clients video of themselves between sets can really help improve and ingrain correct technique as they often ‘feel’ they are doing the right thing but realise they are not when they see themselves.

If you want to learn Olympic lifts please contact me for an individual assessment.

Disclaimer – this is ‘not’ correct dead lift technique and shows the progression of learning ONLY.  Only attempt Olympic lifts under qualified supervision.

About Olympian Stuart McIntosh - My Fitness Mentor

2000 & 2004 Olympian. Founder of My Fitness Mentor -Personal Training Programs for men & women, Sports Conditioning, Athlete Mentoring & Slalom Coaching.
This entry was posted in Athlete, Canoe Slalom, coaching, elite sport, Fitness, Gym, Personal training, Strength & Conditioning and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Learning Olympic Lifts – the Dead Lift

  1. Clive Tanner says:

    Hello Stuart. I came across your blog through the wine blogs. Very good indeed and you look like a fit chap. I’m quite a bit older than you and am well past such big fitness efforts … as much as I’d like to be a lot fitter. My body wouldnt be up for it I dont think. Ha. I probably over indulge in good food and wine but so be it. Good luck with your blogs.

    • Your not the first person to claim a passion for fine food and wine, but balance is paramount….As you get older keeping your strength and fitness level up is really important. Its not about how hard you push yourself in a single training session, but how you go on average over 20 training sessions. You will be surprised how the body can adapt with accumulation over a year!…Don’t write yourself off so soon, some basic training, technique and time is all you need…. If you live local we can catch up for coffee, maybe I can shift your enjoyment from fine food & wine to fitness and set the scales right. (or at least swap some wine recommendations)

  2. John says:

    I just wanted to thank you for liking a post on my blog.
    http://www.ourpersonaljourney.wordpress.com

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